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Living Trees Street Tree Master Plan
Street Tree Master Plan

Street Tree Master Plan


The Recreation and Parks Department encourages community involvement to assist in the decision making process when the future development of the City's urban forest is being considered. Beginning in 1996, the selection of replacement tree species for declining trees in the City's urban forest has been developed through a series of public workshops. Phases of the Street Tree Master Plan are approved by the City Council, with community involvement playing an important role.

The tree replacement list for streets affected by Phase I of the 1996 Street Tree Master Plan is as follows:
  1. Chinese Elm (Ulmus Parvifolia) has been selected for South Almont Drive, South Crescent Drive, El Camino Drive, the 500 - 800 blocks of North Elm Drive, and the 800 block of Loma Vista Drive. The Chinese Elm was selected for its resistance to Dutch Elm disease. Native to the orient, Chinese Elm can be evergreen or semi-deciduous, depending upon the climate each year. This tree has a relatively rapid growth rate, eventually reaching 60 feet in height. The spreading branches of the Chinese Elm create a broad crown with age. The leaves are made up of many leaflets, each oval shaped with a toothed edge. The tree requires routine pruning to maintain its shape and to provide clearance for traffic and pedestrians.
  2. Chinese Flame Tree (Koelreuteria Bipinnata) has been selected for Beverly Green Drive, Hillgreen Drive, Hillgreen Place, South Camden Drive and South Swall Drive. Native to China, this deciduous tree can reach a height of up to 50 feet, with a canopy spread that is equially wide. The leaves of the Chinese Flame Tree are made up of many leaflets, each a lustrous dark green color. Small yellow flowers bloom in late spring, followed by papery lantern-like capsules in the summer. The capsules turn orange, red or salmon color in late summer or fall. Once established, this tree is known for its tolerance of drought, air pollution, and a wide range of soil types. The Chinese Flame Tree requires train pruning when young to develop an open spreading crown. Maturing trees require intermittent pruning to maintain structure.
  3. Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia Indica) has been selected for the 100 - 300 block of Spalding Drive. Native to China, the Crape Myrtle is a slow growing, deciduous tree. The low branching habit of the Crape Myrtle lends itself to a vase shaped tree, reaching 30 feet with age. The Crape Myrtle has become a popular street tree for cramped sites due to its medium size and profuse, long lasting, summer flower displays. New spring leaves emerge a reddish bronze color, maturing to a glossy green. Clusters of white to red flowers develop at the ends of branches during the summer months. The Crape Myrtle requires train pruning when young and routine pruning to maintain shape and promote airflow through the crown as the tree matures. Pruning should occur in the fall to promote flowering the following summer. The bark of Crape Myrtle is thin and care must be taken to prevent injury when working near the trunk.
  4. Fern Pine (Podocarpus Gracilior) has been selected for Durant Drive. Native to East Africa, the Fern Pine is not a pine at all. It is an evergreen that enjoys increasing popularity as a street tree. This popularity is due to a reputation of fine textured cleanliness in the landscape, as well as the ability of the Fern Pine to remain generally free of insect and desease problems. Long lived in the California landscape, the slow growing Fern Pine can reach 60 feet in height and spread to 40 feet in width. The two-inch long, lance shaped leaves of teh Fern Pine are light green when young and bluish green when mature. After train pruning when young to develop structure, the pruning requirements of the Fern Pine are minimal.
  5. Harpullia (Harpullia Arborea) has been selected for South McCarty Drive. Native to India and the Philippine Islands, Harpullia is a flowering tree that reaches a height of 35 feet or more. The evergreen leaves of Harpullia are comprised of many shiny green leaflets. Greenish flowers with red margins grace the Harpullia throughout the warmer months of the year. The flowers are followed by orange fruits, which open to reveal two black seeds. The contrasting fruit and seed display of Harpullia is among the valued attributes of this tree that remains fairly rare in cultivation. Harpullia requires train pruning when young and intermittent pruning as it deveopls a dense, conical crown with age.
  6. Idaho Locust (Robinia Ambigua 'Idahoensis') has been selected for the 100 - 400 blocks of North Elm Drive, South Hamel Drive, the 100 block of North Hamel Drive and Peck Drive. The Idaho Locust is a hybrid between the Black Locust (Robinia Psudoacacia) and the rare Clammy Locust (Robinia Viscosa). The Idaho Locust tree grows fairly quickly, eventually reaching a height of 40 feet or more, with an oval shaped, open canopy that may be as wide as the tree is tall. The Idaho Locust tree is deciduous, green leaflets. Clusters of bright magenta flowers bloom in mid-spring to early summer. Leaves turn a golden color before dropping in the fall. This tree requires train pruning when young to develop good structure. Maturing trees require intermittent pruning to maintain structure and to promote airflow through the crown.
  7. Pink Cedar (Acrocarpus Fraxinifolius) has been selected for South Wetherly Drive. Despite its common name, Pink Cedar is not related to the cedars. Native to Southeast Asia, Pink Cedar is slender in youth, becoming more rounded as heights approach 40 feet. The leaves of Pink Cedar are divided into many leaflets that are reddish while expanding, turning green as they mature. This tree can be deciduous to semi-evergreen, depending on the climate each year. Clusters of small scarlet flowers provide a striking display in the spring. This relatively fast growing tree is fairly rare in cultivation. The Pink Cedar should be train pruned when young to develop good structure. Older trees require intermittent pruning to encourage airflow through the broadening crown.
  8. Pink Trumpet Tree (Tabebuia Impetiginosa) has been selected for Shirley Place. Native to Brazil, The Pink Trumpet tree is a relatively small, deciduous tree that grows rapidly at first and then slows down to an eventual height of about 30 feet. The canopy spread can be somewhat irregular in youth, but with age it achieves a graceful form. Very showy, trumpet-shaped, lavender pink flowers occur in early spring while the tree is leafless. The dark green leaves of the Pink Trumpet tree are arranged like the fingers of a hand. This tree tolerates poor soils and drought once established. The maintenance requirements of the Pink Trumpet tree are minimal, with intermittent pruning to establish and maintain its shape is the only pruning requirements.
  9. Queen Palm (Syagrus Romanzoffiana) has been selected for Hamilton Drive. Native to South America, the Queen Palm can reach a height of 50 feet. The leaves (fronds) of this palm are feather shaped and may be up to 15 feet long, creating a crown of up to 30 feet in width. The one-inch fruit develops in clusters in late spring through early summer. The ripening fruit turns orange before falling from the crown. Maintenance of Queen Palm include annual pruning to remove spent fronds and seed clusters.
  10. Raywood Ash (Fraxinus Oxycarpa'Raywood') has been selected for South Clark Drive, South Elm Drive, Le Doux Road, North Linden Drive and North Rexford Drive. The deciduous Raywood Ash is a cultivar of Narrowleaf Ash, a native of Southern Europe. The fine textured leaves of the Raywood Ash tree are dark green in the summer, turning a purplish red before dropping during years with cooler temperatures. More compact than most ash tree types, the Raywood Ash matures to a 35 foot height, with a dense crown often equal in width. The Raywood Ash is resistant to ash blight and other pests and does not produce the seed litter that often accompanies other ash tree types. After becoming established, this tree requires routine pruning to maintain proper form and structure.
  11. Sawleaf Zelkova (Zelkova Serrata) has been selected for Reeves Drive, South Roxbury Drive and the 400 block of Spalding Drive. Native to Japan, the Zelkova is vase shaped when young, becoming more rounded as it reaches a height of 50 feet or more. The leaves of the Zelkova are divided into many leaflets, each two-three inches long, with a distinctive sawtooth pattern along their edges. The fall leaf color of the Sawleaf Zelkova ranges from yellow to red. Related to the elms, this deciduous tree is tolerant of many of the difficulties facing trees in an urban setting including poor soils, drought and air pollution. Like the elms, this tree requires routine pruning to maintain its shape and to provide clearance for taffic and pedestrians.
  12. Southern Magnolia (Magnolia Grandiflora) has been selected for Gale Drive. Native to the Southeastern United States, the Southern Magnolia is an evergreen tree that eventually reaches a height of 60 feet or more. The crown of mature trees is generally pyramidal in shape and may spread to 40 feet in width. The desirable attributes of Southern Magnolia include glossy green leaves to 10 inches long and spectacular flowers. The fragrant flowers appear in mid-spring to early summer and are often six to ten inches in diameter. The flowers are followed by cone-like seed clusters to four-inches long, each containing many bright red seeds. The seeds are a popular choice to a number of types of birds. Southern Magnolia requires training pruning to develop structure when young. Intermittent pruning of maturing trees is necessary to maintain form and to promote airflow through a spreading crown.
  13. Tipu Tree (Tipuana Tipu) has been selected for North Roxbury Drive. Native to South America, the Tipu is a semi evergreen tree that grows quickly while young. Mature trees may reach 35 to 45 feet in height. The branching habit of the Tipu tree lends to the development of a dome shaped crown as the tree ages. The leaves of the Tipu tree are divided into light green leaflets, each one to two-inches long. During the summer months, the Tipu tree is adorned with clusters of yellow flowers that are followed by maple-like, winged seeds in the fall. The Tipu tree tolerates many of the difficulties facing trees growing in a city environment, including poor soils, heat and drought. Maintenance of the Tipu tree include training pruning when young to develop shape and intermittent pruning to increase airflow through a broad crown with age.
  14. Western Catalpa (Catalpa Speciosa) has been selected for Young Drive. The Western Catalpa is a deciduous native of the central mid-west portion of the United States. Left to develop, this stately tree may grow to 70 feet tall and 50 feet wide with age. The leaves of the Western Catalpa are heart-shaped and may be 12 inches long. In addition to its interesting leaves, this tree is known for its display of clusters of trumpet-shaped, white flowers with yellow stripes and brownish to purple spots. Brown, bean-like pods follow flowers. The Western Catalpa is a popular tree in the West, due to its tolerance of a range of climates and soil types. Careful training pruning when this tree is young will lend to the development of a well structured, dome shaped, crown with age. Maturing Western Catalpa trees require intermittent pruning to promote airflow through a large, spreading crown.